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Equipping Immigrant Selection Systems for a Changing World of Work (Transatlantic Council Statement)

Posted on:
June 4, 2019

Migration Policy Institute (MPI)
July 2019 | Juillet 2019

Press Release | Communiqué de presse

“Labor markets are undergoing dramatic changes as new technologies and forms of employment reshape how and where people work. In many countries, knowledge- and service-intensive sectors are booming, creating new opportunities for highly skilled professionals. At the same time, workers without in-demand analytical and technical skills are finding it more difficult to secure reliable work that pays family-sustaining wages. Many countries are also seeing their workforces age, raising concerns about labor shortages.

These trends pose a stubborn challenge for policymakers: even as some native-born workers are unable to find jobs because they lack the higher education and skills employers increasingly demand, some businesses are struggling to fill job vacancies. Tackling this mismatch will require policymakers to update education, training, social protection, and regional economic development systems, and to critically re-evaluate how economic-stream immigrants are selected.

This Transatlantic Council Statement rounds out a series examining how governments can build migration systems for a new age of economic competitiveness. This report explores the implication of the changing world of work for immigrant selection systems, highlighting key challenges such as figuring out how to anticipate future labor-market needs, balance employer demand with human-capital considerations, and build an element of regional variation into selection processes.

Although labor-market change is nothing new, ‘complacency can be costly,’ the authors warn. ‘[G]lobal competition is unforgiving, and global markets can move quickly to take advantage of policy failures in a particular sector or country.’ Immigration policymakers will need to work with public and private stakeholders across sectors if they are to design selection systems with the transparency, consistency, and flexibility to meet both current and future labor-market needs.”

Table of Contents | Table des matières

I. Introduction

II. Selecting for Economic Growth in Changing Labor Markets

A. A Changing World of Work

B. What Are the Implications for Selection Policies?

III. Creating More Forward-Looking Selection Systems: Key Design Choices

A.      Anticipating Future Labor-Market Needs

B.      Balancing Demand and Human-Capital Considerations

C.      Using Immigration to Economically Revitalize Communities

D.      Striking the Right Balance between Temporary and Permanent Migration, and “Bridging” Opportunities between the Two

IV. Final Thoughts

Download the full report | Télécharger le rapport complet (en anglais) :

https://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/immigrant-selection-systems-changing-world-work

Related resources | Ressources connexes :

2019-05 : The Evolution of the Australian System for Selecting Economic Immigrants

2019-04 : Competing Approaches to Selecting Economic Immigrants: Points-Based vs. Demand-Driven Systems

2019-04 : The Canadian Express Entry System for Selecting Economic Immigrants: Progress and Persistent Challenges

2018-10 : Jobs in 2028: How Will Changing Labor Markets Affect Immigrant Integration in Europe?

Other recent MPI publications | Autre publications récentes de MPI :

2019-07 : Start-Up Visas: A Passport for Innovation and Growth?

2019-07 : A Growing Destination for Sub-Saharan Africans, Morocco Wrestles with Immigrant Integration

2019-06 : Digital Litter: The Downside of Using Technology to Help Refugees

2019-06 : Legal Protections for K-12 English Learner and Immigrant-Background Students

2019-06 : Refugees and Asylees in the United States

2019-06 : Social Innovation for Refugee Inclusion: From Bright Spots to System Change

2019-06 : International Experience Suggests Safe Third-Country Agreement Would Not Solve the U.S.-Mexico Border Crisis

2019-05 : A Profile of Highly Skilled Mexican Immigrants in Texas and the United States

Source:

Research at a Glance is designed to inform the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) community and other interested parties about recently published, policy-relevant research from government, academic and NGO sources. The views expressed in the documents described do not necessarily reflect those of IRCC.

Summary

This report explores the implication of the changing world of work for immigrant selection systems, highlighting key challenges such as figuring out how to anticipate future labor-market needs, balance employer demand with human-capital considerations, and build an element of regional variation into selection processes.
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